What A Trainer Should Look Like

After my surgery I started to view working out in a different light. I watch how peoples mechanics work with their workouts, walk, stand, sit up down and many other forms. It is interesting to see how the body moves and tries to protect itself from age old injuries however minor they are.

I have most of my clients do an assessment when they do not have any known injuries and it has always been interesting when I ask a question about when did you hurt your left leg? Does your right ankle bother you sometimes? Most clients start to think long and hard and have an answer of what happened, I twisted my ankle hiking 4 years ago. When I was a kid I broke my leg but never had any issues with it since.

I find that most people tend not to worry about the injuries when they stop hurting and don’t bother them any more. I have found that this is the time to address it quickly and get it resolved. Over years using your right leg more than your left or vice versus you will run into issues as you age. Knee problems, ankle issues, hips issues or back problems. I have had clients in their 60’s and older that have had a similar issue but never dealt with it. There tends to have been some sort of surgery that we now are working with or arthritis they are dealing with.

All of this can be prevented with a little exercise balancing the body out and adjusting your workouts that fit your body. I will say most trainers I have met tend not to look into this and it is to their clients detriment. If you are going to go to a trainer to lose weight improve performance, etc. You should be having an assessment or them explaining why they are doing a workout with you and what it will benefit. If they can’t give you a proper answer, find a new trainer. There are a lot of us out there, but find the one that knows there stuff and wants to better you for the long haul, not for the short term gains.